trendgraphy:

Not Art.

(via xvoluspa)

Black Markets for Hackers Are Increasingly Sophisticated, Specialized and Maturing | RAND

(Source: emergentfutures, via futuresagency)

fastcompany:

This Is What It’s Like To Watch A Holographic Musician

Janelle Monae appeared on stage as a beam of light, performing with the real-life M.I.A. in New York. Are holographic performers the future?

Read more>

CES 2014: Before their was Google Glass, there was "Forgettable"

prostheticknowledge:

Computers Watching Movies

Art project by Benjamin Grosser utilizes computer vision and tracking to visualize points of interest, demonstrated with six popular films. The gifs above are sped-up versions of The Matrix (top) and 2001: A Space Odyssey (bottom):

Computers Watching Movies shows what a computational system sees when it watches the same films that we do. The work illustrates this vision as a series of temporal sketches, where the sketching process is presented in synchronized time with the audio from the original clip. Viewers are provoked to ask how computer vision differs from their own human vision, and what that difference reveals about our culturally-developed ways of looking. Why do we watch what we watch when we watch it? Will a system without our sense of narrative or historical patterns of vision watch the same things?

Computers Watching Movies was computationally produced using software written by the artist. This software uses computer vision algorithms and artificial intelligence routines to give the system some degree of agency, allowing it to decide what it watches and what it does not. Six well-known clips from popular films are used in the work, enabling many viewers to draw upon their own visual memory of a scene when they watch it. The scenes are from the following movies: 2001: A Space Odyssey, American Beauty, Inception, Taxi Driver, The Matrix, and Annie Hall.

Below is an embedded video of the exhibition cut - you can see seperate parts at Benjamin’s website:

More information and videos can be found at Benjamin’s project page here

(via ryanpanos)

"Everybody has a plan until they get punched in the mouth."

Mike Tyson

(via stoweboyd)

Organizational management is an ontological practice. To spread a mindset is to construct a new reality. IBM’s Watson Jr. did it by having all the employees loosen their ties, a way of constructing a new org man and thus a new company, distinct from the one his father built. We see this unfold anew in companies like Buffer, which embraces millenial culture with calls for ultimate transparency. Would be great to examine the nuances in what has changed since. 
stanfordbusiness:

Leaders who are successful at scaling excellence in their companies think of it as spreading a mindset, not a footprint. In their new book “Scaling Up Excellence,” Professors Robert Sutton and Hayagreeva Rao explore how the best teams develop and instill the right growth mindset in their organizations. Read more: http://stnfd.biz/soKex and watch the video interview: http://stnfd.biz/soKgZ #scalingup

Organizational management is an ontological practice. To spread a mindset is to construct a new reality. IBM’s Watson Jr. did it by having all the employees loosen their ties, a way of constructing a new org man and thus a new company, distinct from the one his father built. We see this unfold anew in companies like Buffer, which embraces millenial culture with calls for ultimate transparency. Would be great to examine the nuances in what has changed since. 

stanfordbusiness:

Leaders who are successful at scaling excellence in their companies think of it as spreading a mindset, not a footprint. In their new book “Scaling Up Excellence,” Professors Robert Sutton and Hayagreeva Rao explore how the best teams develop and instill the right growth mindset in their organizations. Read more: http://stnfd.biz/soKex and watch the video interview: http://stnfd.biz/soKgZ #scalingup

"E-books clearly have an important story to tell beyond their ability to reproduce the form and function of printed books. Theirs is a story about the logic of capitalist accumulation and how it has been shifting over the last century. Today’s e-book technologies constitute the end result of more than fifty years’ worth of effort to render problematic people’s accumulation and circulation of printed books, as well as those of other mass-produced goods. As such, e-books both express and embody a practical critique of consumer capitalism. This is no cause for celebration, however. Whatever critique of capitalism they offer ultimately advances a more intensive mode of capitalist accumulation, one significantly premised on the management of commodities and hence the ways in which consumers interact with them."

The Late Age of Print, Ted Striphas (2009)

(Source: cup.columbia.edu, via notational)

"But here is the ultimate consequence of the internet moving offline. If images can be shared and circulated, why can’t everything else be too? If data moves across screens, so can its material incarnations move across shop windows and other enclosures. If copyright can be dodged and called into question, why can’t private property? If one can share a restaurant dish JPEG on Facebook, why not the real meal? Why not apply fair use to space, parks, and swimming pools? Why only claim open access to JSTOR and not MIT—or any school, hospital, or university for that matter? Why shouldn’t data clouds discharge as storming supermarkets? Why not open-source water, energy, and Dom Pérignon champagne?"

Hito Steyerl, "Too Much World: Is The Internet Dead?" e-flux #49 (11/2013)

(Source: givemeabody, via notational)

slowartday:

KwangHo Shin

(via mandaflewaway)